Facts about fracking

5 things to know about fracking

Origin’s exploration is supported by the rightful Traditional Owners

There are many different Traditional Owner groups in the Northern Territory. We work closely with the Northern Land Council to ensure we seek and maintain the support of the right Native Title holder family groups in the areas where we are working. We have the support of these family groups and they are optimistic about the opportunities this project brings to their community. We will continue to engage with them at each step of the project.

We apply a rigorous process to ensure we use best practice in our operations

We make sure we have the right approvals and support in place before we start our operations. We use world’s best standards to make sure land and water is protected, and we undertake thorough and respectful consultation with traditional owners and landholders. This includes speaking to the right people, explaining the details of our work program, and achieving sacred site clearances. 

We have strict conditions in place to ensure land and water is protected

We don’t start fracking until we know we have the right safeguards and controls in place. For example, we ensure the wells have multiple layers of steel and cement to separate them from the underground layers of rock. There’s also at least 1km of impenetrable rock between the shales being fracked and the aquifer sitting close to the surface. Independent monitoring starts before our work begins and continues throughout the project to ensure the area’s groundwater is protected.

Keeping emissions to a minimum is a priority

We operate as efficiently and safely as we can when producing gas to safeguard the environment and avoid wastage. We are currently in the exploration phase, which means we haven’t yet decided if we will move to production. If we do, we will need to do more planning and scoping work to determine the scale of the project and any potential emissions. Our work is all subject to government environmental approval processes. 

Water use is kept to a minimum

We conserve water use as much as we can by recycling and reusing water across our wells during the drilling and fracking process. We must carefully manage our water use and operate under a regulated water allocation plan. We must also gain a water extraction licence as part of our approval process. This ensures water is extracted within the parameters of the sustainable yield for the local aquifer.  Cattle and agriculture currently uses around 6% of the sustainable yield. In a future development scenario, at most, our water use would increase that percentage by 1%.

Get the facts about hydraulic fracture stimulation (fracking)

Fracking has been undertaken safely in the Northern Territory for more than 40 years but the processes are often misrepresented and misunderstood.